Summer classes to spice things up

Brittany Burns, Contributing Writer
May 18, 2014
Filed under Wright Life

Wright State University students can look for new and creative courses offered this summer. The courses range from film, to cooking and even outdoor exploration. These courses are only available during the summer 2014 semester.

One film course currently offered is Women in Film, and is taught by Nicole Richter, associate professor of motion pictures. This is her second summer teaching the course for undergraduates, and there are no prerequisites.

“This course evolved from Independent Filmmaker, Professor Emeritus Julia Reichert. Her teachings in the contemporary and older film generations lead to the creation of the Women in Film course,” Richter said. “The course is designed to be an integrated writing and film analysis from the director’s point of view.”

One of the main goals is to show students just how diverse film directing can be. Students looking for career opportunities may join the class to explore the different media aspects of the film industry.

“The career opportunities can range from film making, communication through the media and film criticism,” Richter said.

Another new course from the College of Liberal Arts comes from the Modern Languages Department. Cuisine in French Cinema is taught by Karine C. Ould-Daddah. This is the second time the course has been offered in the summer since 2012, and is fast-paced and exciting.

“This course was created based on the art of cooking. What sets this course apart from the other French courses is that this course requires students to be more hands-on in cooking practicum,” Ould-Daddah said. “I really enjoy being able to teach my students my love for cooking. Students learn new vocabulary and cooking techniques, and best of all, they are introduced to new dishes and foods!”

This is a fast-paced course that only lasts two weeks. The prerequisites needed for this course are FR 3210 and FR 3220.

On a different vein, biology majors will be interested in taking Evolution and Ecology with James R. Runkle of the Department of Biological Sciences. The course looks at the major reasons why populations of organisms change overtime.

“It has many outdoor labs so it is fun to teach each summer or fall semester. It teaches the fundamental truths about the world that enrich a student’s personal and professional life as well,” Runkle said.

Many more classes exist for students looking for a new and interesting topic or subject area.

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