Veterans Day is more than a three day weekend

Elizabeth Schoppelrei, Contributing Writer

For most students, Veterans Day, Nov. 11, is a great three-day weekend, but it means more than that.

Veterans Day became an officially recognized holiday in 1954, and from 1968 to 1978, it took place on the fourth Monday in October. Congress changed it back to Nov. 11 due to the historical significance of the date, which marks the end of the World War I conflicts.

Veterans Day celebrates the veterans of the United States. For each veteran or current service member, the day has a unique significance.

“Veterans Day is a time to acknowledge the service and sacrifice of military members and their families,” Wright State alumnus Audra King said. “I am proud of having served my country and I wish more people understood what that means for those who have done it.”

“Veterans Day celebrates and remembers the service of any person who has or is serving in the military,” Lieutenant Colonel Ken Ratliff said. “Regardless if a person has fought in a war or held stateside duties, Veterans Day is a time to remember their sacrifices.”

The sacrifices of the military men and women are numerous and Ratliff mentioned that all must give up “some individual freedoms e.g. appearance preferences, work schedule, duty location etc. in order to meet the needs of the country” for the “greater good.”

“I always feel especially grateful for those who continue to put themselves in harm’s way, and even though I don’t always agree with how our military is used I am thankful for those who are serving in it,” King said.

So take time this week to thank a veteran. According to Ratliff, we are somewhat unique in our relationship with our military.

“I have traveled to several other countries and none have the patriotism and support the military in the manner Americans do,” Ratliff said. “I’m grateful for the day of recognition by our country.”

Happy Veterans Day!

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