New initiative started to increase percentage of Ohio residents with an educational degree

Jessica Schirtzinger, Staff Writer
November 7, 2012
Filed under News

Recognizing the need for Ohio residents to get college degrees to compete in an increasingly globalized economy, Ohio Chancellor Jim Petro has started an initiative to increase the percentage of Ohio residents with an educational degree.

Currently, 36% of Ohio’s population possesses an associate’s degree and only 26% have earned a four-year degree, according to Petro. This is a low percentage in comparison to other US states (by about five percent).

Petro has developed a Complete College Ohio task force by selecting 28 people to make up the program.  They will not only research why Ohio’s population is suffering from a deficiency in higher education, but will also identify the difficulties, such as financial issues, faced by citizens who want to examine a college degree.

The task force will also evaluate the most effective methods for improving residents’ access to education to improve the current condition of Ohio’s lagging economy.

Some of the task force’s areas of focus include: improving career counseling to high school students to help them better navigate confusing application processes, requiring public schools to provide 3-year degree programs which are less expensive in comparison to 4-year degrees, finding an alternative to the Ohio Graduation Test that better reflects educational success and strengthening collaboration between the Ohio Board of Regents and the Ohio Department of Education to better prepare high school graduates for successful college careers.

Print Friendly